FlexDeploy’s WebLogic plugin provides various operations to automate the management of domain configurations. Similar to build and deploy of J2EE applications, you can utilize SCM repositories like Subversion, Git, TFS, CVS etc. to maintain configuration files and setup Build and Deploy workflows in FlexDeploy.

Let me show you show it works:  

See a very simple Data Source configuration file below, which defines two Data Sources.

datasource_properties

Notice the use of variables like ${{FLX_DB_PASSWORD_FDADMIN}}, which will be automatically replaced when the Deploy workflow executes for a specific environment. You can also override specific values for each environment by providing override files, see the below variation of the file for DEV and PROD environments. You can just provide values that you would like to be different from the main configuration file. See more details on property file details at https://flexagon.atlassian.net/wiki/display/fd40/createOrUpdateDataSources

datasource_properties_dev

See different value for Max Capacity for Production as we are expecting more activity in that environment.

datasource_properties_prod

Now let’s take a quick look at the FlexDeploy workflow. We will utilize WebLogic plugin operation – createOrUpdateDataSources. You can optionally provide path to properties file. If nothing is specified, all artifact files will be scanned to find data source property configuration files.

ds_workflow

This is very simple one step workflow, which was created (using the graphical workflow editor)  by dragging the createOrUpdateDataSources operation.

ds_plugin_operation
Now just like any other FlexDeploy project, you can run Build and Deploy processes to manage data source configurations in your environments.

ds_flexdeploy_project

You can see data sources deployed in WebLogic domain.

ds_weblogic_domain

Now, you can add more data sources or update existing and then just commit configuration files and automatically promote it to various environments. You can take advantage of enterprise features of FlexDeploy using this approach to automate configurations management.

DataSources are essential to application execution and incorrect configurations can lead to functional and/or performance issues. Automation not only helps avoid runtime issues, but also saves administrator time. Administrators and/or developers can manage configurations collaboratively and rely on FlexDeploy to seamlessly apply changes across various environments.

Chandresh Patel

I have been working with Java EE technologies since 2000. After implementing IBM WebSphere and custom framework solutions, my past 10 years have been focused on Oracle Fusion Middleware such as WebLogic, ADF, WebCenter and Coherence. I have been part of many automation projects in the past and have a passion for automation capabilities to help our customers deliver software faster and with higher quality. In my current role as a Principal Architect at Flexagon, I am driving the FlexDeploy product strategy and development to build DevOps/CI/CD features that help our customers.

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2 Comments

  • Jags says:

    Hey
    Saw your blogs and very helpful. Facing an Server Memory issue, checking if you can give some inputs . Every week at a particular day server gets into high memory which causes to recycle the server. I have analysed the heap dump, majorly the weblogic.servlet.internal.session.ReplicatedSessionData holds the data. while googling on this have seen one of your blog on ADF.

    • Chandresh Patel says:

      Is your JVM setup to generate heap dump on out of memory error? This is important as things may change later if offending thread has stopped by the time you start manual heap dump.
      I have seen ReplicatedSessionData in heap dump, but it never has been problem as we don’t generally keep too much information in user http session. But you should look deeper into it and make sure there is no leak there.
      If server fails at a particular time, then this issue may be related to some background job, so checking logs around what was executing can provide some hint as well.

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